Vintage Royal Albert Bone china Petite Point Handled Mini Creamer and sugar set

  • Royal Albert china Co
  • Made in the England
  • Petite Point
  • Mini creamer and open sugar set
  • Creamer stands 3″ tall
  • Open sugar bowl 2″ tall
  • Condition:
  • These come in ex condition
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Johnson Brothers England Old English Countryside in brown Multicolored. Tea Pot

Johnson Brothers England Old English Countryside in brown Multicolored. Tea Pot

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Johnson Brothers Made in England

$_57 (1)

 Called Old English Country side 

In brown Multicolored 

$_57 (2)

Tea pot,  holds 5 cups

$_57 (4)

This comes in great condition

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How To Throw A Historically Accurate Downton Abbey Dinner Party.

china glass and more

IMAGES NOT TO BE USED BEFORE 13TH SEPTEMBER 2011. 2011 DOWNTON ABBEY  SERIES 2 EPISODE2  DOWNTON ABBEY returns for a second series. Pictured: General dinner scene Photographer: NICK BRIGGS This photograph is (C) CARNIVAL FILMS and can only be reproduced for editorial purposes directly in connection with the programme or event mentioned above, or CARNIVAL FILMS. Once made available by ITV plc Picture Desk, this photograph can be reproduced once only up until the transmission [TX] date and no reproduction fee will be charged. Any subsequent usage may incur a fee. This photograph must not be manipulated [excluding basic  cropping] in a manner which alters the visual appearance of the person photographed deemed detrimental or inappropriate by ITV plc Picture Desk.  This photograph must not be syndicated to any other company, publication or website, or permanently archived, without the express written permission of ITV Plc Picture Desk.

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What You’ll Need

– A white cloth tablecloth (nothing else will do). Make sure it hangs midway between the floor and the table.

– A wool cloth that goes underneath the formal tablecloth to keep it in place.

– white napkins you use “should be approximately twenty-four to twenty-six inches on a side.” The napkins should be folded in The Bishop’s Miter style. You can find the directions here.

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For a historically accurate Downton Abbey dinner party, you would use the formal place setting. The place setting “must be balanced…[and] must be in line with the centerpiece and candlesticks.” For accuracy use a tape measurer.

In the diagram of a place setting, the dinner plate will arrive when the meal is served.

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– Use either fruit or flowers (not both) for the centerpiece. If flowers, make sure they don’t have a strong scent.

– The only light source should be candlelight…

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How to set a formal Table..

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Utensils are placed about an inch from the edge of the table, with all placed either upon the same invisible baseline or upon the same invisible median line. Utensils in the outermost position are used first (for example, a soup spoon and a salad fork, then the dinner fork and the dinner knife). The blades of the knives are turned toward the plate. Glasses are placed an inch or so above the knives, also in the order of use: white wine, red wine, dessert wine, and water tumbler.Formal dinner

The most formal dinner is served from the kitchen. When the meal is served, in addition to the central plate (a service plate or dinner plate at supper; at luncheon, a service plate or luncheon plate) at each place there are a bread roll (generally on a bread plate, sometimes in the napkin), napkin, and flatware (knives and spoons to the right of the central plate, and forks to the left). Coffee is served in Butler Service style in demitasses, Cup and saucer and a spoon placed on the saucer to the right of each handle. Serving dishes and utensils are not placed on the table for a formal dinner.[1] The only exception in the West to these general rules is the protocol followed at the Spanish royal court, which was also adopted by the Austrian court, in which all flatware was placed to the right of the central plate for each diner.
At a less formal dinner, not served from the kitchen, the dessert fork and spoon can be set above the plate, fork pointing right, spoon pointing left.